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Jamaican Hummingbirds of Mystic Mountain, Ocho Rios

Mystic Mountain, a 100 acre tropical forest attraction, 700 feet above sea level, at Ocho Rios in the Parish of Saint Ann is a regular hangout for three of the five hummingbird species known on the island of Jamaica. The Jamaican mango, the red-billed streamertail (a.k.a. western streamertail, also doctor bird), and the vervain hummingbird, one of the smallest bird in the world, haunt a natural spring, vistas, dells, and panoramas below an ample canopy of the semi-evergreen forest, as well as, the park's hummingbird garden stocked with the passion-flower vine, cigar plant, pepper hibiscus, fire spike, red tassel tree, China hat, and shrimp plant, which was prepared to attract and feed hummingbirds, (see video below).

Regarding the three Mystic Mountain species, the Jamaican mango is endemic to Jamaica; the red-billed streamertail, also, is endemic to jamaica and the most widespread hummingbird species on the island, found west of a line roughly drawn, north to south, from Morant Bay to Port Antonio in eastern Jamaica; and it is the national bird of Jamaica. The vervain hummingbird is one of the smallest birds in the world.

The two other Jamaican hummingbirds are less likely to be seen at Mystic Mountain as the black-billed streamertail (eastern streamertail), disputed as a separate species from the red-billed streamertail, is of eastern Jamaica and the ruby-throated hummingbird is accidental on the island being migratory, spending the summer months in North America (United States and Canada) and the winter months in the West Indies, Central America, and South America.

With respect to the new hummingbird clade classification, the streamertail hummingbirds of the Trochilus genus are members of the emerald clade—the males of the emerald genus are iridescent green, gilded-green, or bluish-green, and some have blue tails or throats; females are typified by grey-white underparts and streaks behind the eye. The Jamaican mango of the Anthracothorax genus—distinguished by their coal-black chest—is a member of the mango clade and the vervain hummingbird of the genus Mellisuga along with the ruby-throated hummingbird of the genus Archilochusis are members of the bees clade—the bees are mostly small hummingbirds, a few medium sized, and typically, with some exceptions, with long, straight, and slender bills, and upperparts with some variation of green; males typically have well-developed iridescent gorgets.

Included in our descriptions is the Jamaican tody, which is not a hummingbird, but closely resembles an overgrown one in colouration and shape; and the endemic Jamaican giant swallowtail butterfly, which is the largest butterfly in the western hemisphere.

Jamaica Hummers
Black-billed Streamertail
Hummingbird
Jamaican Giant Swallowtail Butterfly
Hummingbird
Jamaican Mango
Hummingbird
Jamaican Tody
Hummingbird
Red-billed Streamertail
Hummingbird
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Hummingbird
Vervain Hummingbird
Hummingbird



Mystic Mountain Jamaica Tranopy Tour